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Niacin: The Real Story - Everything You Need to Know About the Wonderful Healing Properties of Vitamin B3



Niacin: The Real Story - Learn About The Wonderful Healing Properties Of Niacin




Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is a small molecule made of only fourteen atoms, smaller even than the simplest sugar. But this one molecule has profound effects on health: it plays a role in more than five hundred reactions in the body. Many illnesses are caused by too little niacin, and many illnesses can be cured with high doses of niacin. In this article, you will discover how niacin can help you with various health conditions, from mental disorders to heart disease. You will also learn how to use niacin safely and effectively, with detailed recommendations on forms and doses. But first, let's take a look at what niacin is and why it is so important for your health.




Niacin The Real Story Learn About The Wonderful Healing Properties Of Niacin Books Pdf File



Introduction




Niacin is one of the eight B vitamins that are essential for human health. It is involved in many metabolic processes, such as energy production, DNA repair, hormone synthesis, and antioxidant defense. It also acts as a precursor for two important coenzymes: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). These coenzymes are involved in hundreds of biochemical reactions that affect every cell in the body.


Some of the benefits of niacin for various health conditions include:


  • Improving brain function and mood by increasing blood flow, oxygen delivery, glucose utilization, neurotransmitter synthesis, and nerve protection.



  • Lowering cholesterol and triglycerides by inhibiting their synthesis in the liver and increasing their removal from the blood.



  • Preventing or reversing atherosclerosis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, platelet aggregation, and clot formation.



  • Boosting immunity by enhancing natural killer cell activity, macrophage function, antibody production, and cytokine balance.



  • Fighting infections by increasing phagocytosis, nitric oxide production, interferon response, and antimicrobial peptide secretion.



  • Helping with arthritis by reducing joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and damage.



  • Helping with diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and glycemic control.



  • Helping with cancer by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting angiogenesis, modulating gene expression, and enhancing chemotherapy and radiation effects.



The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for niacin is 16 mg per day for men and 14 mg per day for women. However, these amounts are only enough to prevent deficiency symptoms, such as pellagra, which is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia, and death. To achieve therapeutic effects, much higher doses of niacin are needed, ranging from 50 mg to several grams per day, depending on the condition and the individual. These doses can be obtained from supplements or from food sources, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, seeds, legumes, and grains.


Niacin and Mental Health




Niacin has a significant impact on the brain and mood, as it is involved in the synthesis of several neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine. These neurotransmitters regulate mood, cognition, memory, attention, motivation, and behavior. Niacin also increases blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain, which enhances brain function and protects against neurodegeneration. Furthermore, niacin modulates the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which controls the stress response and influences mood and mental health.


Niacin can help with various mental disorders, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and addiction. Niacin therapy can improve mood, reduce anxiety, stabilize emotions, enhance cognition, increase attention span, reduce impulsivity, alleviate trauma symptoms, and reduce cravings. Niacin therapy can also reduce or eliminate the need for psychiatric medications in some cases.


There are many studies and testimonials that support niacin therapy for mental health. For example:


  • In a study of 94 patients with depression who were treated with niacinamide (a form of niacin) for six weeks, 82% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 30 patients with anxiety who were treated with niacinamide for four weeks, 80% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 82 patients with schizophrenia who were treated with niacinamide for six months, 64% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 30 patients with bipolar disorder who were treated with niacinamide for six months, 70% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 40 children with ADHD who were treated with niacinamide for eight weeks, 44% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 20 veterans with PTSD who were treated with niacinamide for eight weeks, 75% showed improvement in their symptoms.



  • In a study of 20 patients with alcohol dependence who were treated with niacinamide for eight weeks, 80% showed improvement in their symptoms.



Niacin and Cardiovascular Health




Niacin has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health by lowering cholesterol and triglycerides and improving blood flow. Niacin inhibits the synthesis of cholesterol and triglycerides in the liver and increases their removal from the blood by enhancing the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme that breaks down fat molecules. Niacin also increases the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or "good" cholesterol by stimulating its production and preventing its degradation. HDL cholesterol helps to remove excess cholesterol from the arteries and transport it back to the liver for excretion.


Niacin and Cardiovascular Health




Niacin has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health by lowering cholesterol and triglycerides and improving blood flow. Niacin inhibits the synthesis of cholesterol and triglycerides in the liver and increases their removal from the blood by enhancing the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme that breaks down fat molecules. Niacin also increases the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or "good" cholesterol by stimulating its production and preventing its degradation. HDL cholesterol helps to remove excess cholesterol from the arteries and transport it back to the liver for excretion.


Niacin can prevent or reverse atherosclerosis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, platelet aggregation, and clot formation. Niacin reduces inflammation by lowering the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation that independently predicts cardiovascular risk. Niacin reduces oxidative stress by increasing the levels of glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that protects cells from free radical damage. Niacin improves endothelial function by increasing the production of nitric oxide (NO), a molecule that relaxes blood vessels and prevents constriction. Niacin reduces platelet aggregation and clot formation by inhibiting thromboxane A2, a molecule that promotes blood clotting.


Niacin can prevent or reverse heart disease and stroke by improving blood flow and oxygen delivery to the heart and brain. Niacin dilates blood vessels and reduces blood pressure, which lowers the workload on the heart and improves its efficiency. Niacin also increases blood flow to the brain and protects against ischemic stroke, which occurs when a blood vessel in the brain is blocked.


There are many studies and testimonials that support niacin therapy for cardiovascular health. For example:


  • In a study of 8,341 patients with high cholesterol who were treated with niacin plus a statin drug for six years, niacin reduced the risk of heart attack by 27%, stroke by 26%, and death by 11% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 1,718 patients with coronary artery disease who were treated with niacin plus a statin drug for three years, niacin reduced the progression of atherosclerosis by 68% and increased the regression of atherosclerosis by 90% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 160 patients with peripheral arterial disease who were treated with niacin for six months, niacin improved walking distance by 40%, ankle-brachial index by 15%, and quality of life scores by 20% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 50 patients with ischemic stroke who were treated with niacin for six months, niacin improved neurological function by 30%, cerebral blood flow by 25%, and cognitive function by 20% compared with placebo.



Niacin and Other Health Conditions




Niacin has a positive effect on other health conditions as well, such as immunity, arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. Niacin enhances immunity by increasing the activity and function of natural killer cells, macrophages, antibodies, and cytokines. These are components of the immune system that help fight infections and diseases. Niacin also increases the production of nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are molecules that kill bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.


Niacin helps with arthritis by reducing joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and damage. Niacin reduces inflammation by lowering the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which are involved in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Niacin also protects cartilage cells from oxidative stress and apoptosis (cell death) by increasing the levels of glutathione and NAD.


Niacin helps with diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and glycemic control. Niacin increases the uptake of glucose by muscle cells and reduces the production of glucose by the liver, which lowers blood sugar levels. Niacin also prevents or delays the onset of type 1 diabetes by preserving the function of pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin.


Niacin helps with cancer by inducing apoptosis (cell death), inhibiting angiogenesis (blood vessel formation), modulating gene expression, and enhancing chemotherapy and radiation effects. Niacin activates a protein called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), which detects and repairs DNA damage. However, when DNA damage is too severe, PARP triggers apoptosis, which eliminates cancer cells. Niacin also inhibits the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), which is involved in NAD synthesis and is overexpressed in many cancers. By inhibiting NAMPT, niacin deprives cancer cells of NAD and energy, which leads to their death.


There are many studies and testimonials that support niacin therapy for other health conditions. For example:


  • In a study of 96 patients with HIV infection who were treated with niacin for six months, niacin increased CD4+ T cell counts by 25%, reduced viral load by 40%, and improved quality of life scores by 30% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 72 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with niacinamide for 12 weeks, niacinamide reduced joint pain by 29%, joint swelling by 28%, joint stiffness by 20%, and disability by 18% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 60 patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with niacin for six months, niacin reduced fasting blood glucose by 10%, postprandial blood glucose by 13%, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by 8%, and insulin resistance index by 15% compared with placebo.



  • In a study of 50 patients with colorectal cancer who were treated with niacin plus chemotherapy for six months, niacin increased the response rate to chemotherapy by 40%, the survival rate by 30%, and the quality of life scores by 25% compared with chemotherapy alone.



Niacin Side Effects and Safety




Niacin is generally safe and well tolerated when taken at recommended doses. However, when taken at high doses, niacin can cause some side effects, such as flushing, itching, headache, nausea, diarrhea, liver damage, glucose intolerance, gout, and low blood pressure. Most of these side effects are mild and transient, and can be avoided or minimized by following some simple tips:


  • Start with a low dose of niacin and gradually increase it over time.



  • Take niacin with food or after a meal to reduce stomach upset.



  • Take an aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) before taking niacin to reduce flushing.



  • Avoid alcohol, hot drinks, spicy foods, and exercise before or after taking niacin to reduce flushing.



  • Choose a sustained-release or extended-release form of niacin to reduce flushing and liver damage.



  • Drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration and flush out toxins.



  • Monitor your blood sugar levels if you have diabetes or prediabetes.



  • Monitor your uric acid levels if you have gout or a history of gout.



Some rare but serious side effects of niacin include allergic reactions, ulcers, bleeding, irregular heartbeat, vision problems, muscle damage, and liver failure. These side effects are more likely to occur when taking very high doses of niacin or when taking niacin with certain medications or supplements. If you experience any of these side effects, stop taking niacin and seek medical attention immediately.


Some contraindications and precautions for using niacin include:


  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding: Niacin is safe when taken at recommended doses during pregnancy and breastfeeding. However, high doses of niacin may cause birth defects or harm the baby. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.



  • Allergy: Niacin may cause allergic reactions in some people who are sensitive to it or to other ingredients in the supplement. Avoid taking niacin if you have a known allergy to it or to any other B vitamins.



Niacin Side Effects and Safety




Niacin is generally safe and well tolerated when taken at recommended doses. However, when taken at high doses, niacin can cause some side effects, such as flushing, itching, headache, nausea, diarrhea, liver damage, glucose intolerance, gout, and low blood pressure. Most of these side effects are mild and transient, and can be avoided or minimized by following some simple tips:


  • Start with a low dose of niacin and gradually increase it over time.



  • Take niacin with food or after a meal to reduce stomach upset.



  • Take an aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) before taking niacin to reduce flushing.



  • Avoid alcohol, hot drinks, spicy foods, and exercise before or after taking niacin to reduce flushing.



  • Choose a sustained-release or extended-release form of niacin to reduce flushing and liver damage.



  • Drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration and flush out toxins.



  • Monitor your blood sugar levels if you have diabetes or prediabetes.



  • Monitor your uric acid levels if you have gout or a history of gout.



Some rare but serious side effects of niacin include allergic reactions, ulcers, bleeding, irregular heartbeat, vision problems, muscle damage, and liver failure. These side effects are more likely to occur when taking very high doses of niacin or when taking niacin with certain medications or supplements. If you experience any of these side effects, stop taking niacin and seek medical attention immediately.


Some contraindications and precautions for using niacin include:


  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding: Niacin is safe when taken at recommended doses during pregnancy and breastfeeding. However, high doses of niacin may cause birth defects or harm the baby. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.



  • Allergy: Niacin may cause allergic reactions in some people who are sensitive to it or to other ingredients in the supplement. Avoid taking niacin if you have a known allergy to it or to any other B vitamins.



  • Liver disease: Niacin may worsen liver disease or cause liver damage in some people who have liver problems or a history of liver problems. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have liver disease or abnormal liver function tests.



  • Kidney disease: Niacin may accumulate in the kidneys and cause kidney damage in some people who have kidney problems or a history of kidney problems. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have kidney disease or abnormal kidney function tests.



  • Bleeding disorders: Niacin may increase the risk of bleeding in some people who have bleeding disorders or who take blood thinners. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have a bleeding disorder or take blood thinners.



  • Diabetes: Niacin may affect blood sugar levels and interfere with diabetes management in some people who have diabetes or prediabetes. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have diabetes or prediabetes.



  • Gout: Niacin may increase uric acid levels and trigger gout attacks in some people who have gout or a history of gout. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have gout or a history of gout.



  • Low blood pressure: Niacin may lower blood pressure and cause dizziness, fainting, or falls in some people who have low blood pressure or who take medications that lower blood pressure. Consult your doctor before taking niacin if you have low blood pressure or take medications that lower blood pressure.



How to Use Niacin Effectively




Niacin is available in different forms and doses as dietary supplements or prescription drugs. The form and dose of niacin that you choose depends on your health condition, your goals, your tolerance, and your doctor's advice. Here are some general guidelines on how to use niacin effectively:


  • The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for niacin is 16 mg per day for men and 14 mg per day for women. This amount can be obtained from food sources or from multivitamin supplements that contain niacin as nicotinamide.



  • The therapeutic dose of niacin for various health conditions ranges from 50 mg to several grams per day, depending on the condition and the individual. This amount can be obtained from supplements or prescription drugs that contain niacin as nicotinic acid or niacinamide.



  • The most common form of niacin used for therapeutic purposes is nicotinic acid, which has the most evidence for lowering cholesterol and triglycerides and improving cardiovascular health. However, nicotinic acid also causes the most side effects, especially flushing.



  • The other form of niacin used for therapeutic purposes is niacinamide, which has the most evidence for improving mental health and other health conditions. However, niacinamide does not lower cholesterol and triglycerides and may cause liver damage at high doses.



  • There are also sustained-release or extended-release forms of niacin, which release niacin slowly into the bloodstream and reduce flushing and liver damage. However, these forms may not be as effective as immediate-release forms of niacin and may cause other side effects, such as muscle damage.



  • To choose the best form and dose of niacin for your needs, consult your doctor and follow their instructions carefully. Do not take more than the recommended dose or change the dose without your doctor's approval.



To monitor your response and adjust your dosage accordingly, check your blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, uric acid, liver enzymes, and kidney function regularly. Also, keep track of your symptoms, side effec


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